Think Centre’s tribute to Fong Swee Suan

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Posted by Think Centre under Breaking News on 7 February 2017

A pioneering leader in our struggle for independence against British rule, he was a leader of the Barisan Socialis, co-founder of the People’s Action Party, and an ardent trade unionist. Mr Fong Swee Suan left his mark on the early struggles for Singapore’s political freedom, self-determination and fight for the common workers’ dignity.

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Singapore, Vote for UN Moratorium on the Use of the Death Penalty

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Posted by Think Centre under Policy Watch, Statement on 16 December 2016

Singapore laws, especially on the death penalty, are rooted in our colonial history, which the colonial masters used to reign in, control and exploit a disunited colony of immigrants. Such archaic colonial practices and attitudes should be reviewed and removed from the penal code. If Singapore wants to play the cautious conservative on the issue of enacting a moratorium, which is a clear commitment in recognising the sanctity of human life, it can abstain and watch as it falls behind in moral authority among its peers. The Think Centre, however, urges the Singapore government to rise up to the moral challenge and vote for the resolution on moratorium on the use of the death penalty.

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Local and International groups express solidarity for the families of executed prisoners in Singapore

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Posted by Think Centre under Human Rights Watch, Policy Watch, Statement on 26 November 2016

We, the undersigned organisations, condemn the shameful execution of a Nigerian national, Chijioke Stephen Obioha, and a Malaysian national, Devendran a/l Supramaniam in Singapore on 18 November 2016, which runs counter to global trends towards abolition of capital punishment. We remain appalled that Singapore continues to execute people in contravention of international law and standards. We would like to express our regret and share in the disappointment of the families of the executed men. We oppose the use of capital punishment in all circumstances, as a violation of human rights which can never be justified under the flawed assumption that it has a unique deterrent effect.

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Singapore: New Contempt of Court Law Further Curtails Limited Freedom of Expression

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Posted by Think Centre under Policy Watch, Statement on 22 August 2016

The Asian Forum for Human Rights and Development (FORUM-ASIA) and its Singaporean member, Think Centre, condemn the passage of the Administration of Justice (Protection) Bill by the Singaporean Parliament on Monday 15 August. It further restricts the limited right to freedom of expression and press freedom in the country. The new Law deems contempt of court a criminal offence punishable by disproportionate penalties and provides a vague and broad definition of contempt including prejudicing court matters, disobeying court orders, and scandalising the courts. “The Law can be used to silence citizens, civil society, and human rights organisations from voicing their opinions over any judicial process. Speaking out on judicial errors as part of exercising the right to freedom of expression is essential to exposing injustice,” says Mukunda Kattel, Director of FORUM-ASIA. “Given the tremendously difficult situation in Singapore regarding freedom of expression, the new Law can only be seen as another attempt by the Government to restrict the work of civil society,” adds Samydorai Sinapan, Director of ASEAN Affairs, Think Centre.

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Oral Statement Delivered On behalf of (FORUM-ASIA) at the 24th June 2016 Universal Periodic Review plenary on Singapore

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Posted by Think Centre under Statement on 24 July 2016

We are alarmed that Singapore has rejected nearly half of the 236 recommendations it received. This sets a negative precedence regionally and globally for the UPR process and is a disturbing indication of the country’s unwillingness to cooperate with international human rights processes.

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Oral Statement Delivered by Think Centre President Adrian Heok on Singapore's UPR report at the 32nd Session of Human Rights Council

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Posted by Think Centre under Statement on 24 July 2016

Without an independent way of verifying the government’s claims about compliance, it is critical that a national human rights institution be established immediately in accordance with the Paris Principles. Prolonged detentions without judicial review under the Internal Security Act and the Criminal Law (Temporary Provisions) Act continue with no transparency over the numbers being detained. Executions often take place without adequate warning given to the prisoners or their families. We regret that the government rejected the 25 recommendations that called for the abolition of the death penalty and corporal punishment.

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Every Voice Makes Us Stronger. Speak Up Against the Death Penalty!

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Posted by Think Centre under on 28 May 2016

Often those against the death penalty may not speak up. We may not believe one voice can make a difference. But if each one of us speaks up, our collective voice gets louder and stronger against the death penalty - and the death penalty can be abolished.

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Capital Punishment: Singapore’s blatant disregard for the right to life

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Posted by Think Centre under Breaking News, Human Rights Watch, Policy Watch on 20 May 2016

The family of Kho Jabing is in anguish as they are forced to confront his death after his conviction for unintentional murder was upheld and appeals quashed. The same Apex court of 5 judges dismissed Kho Jabing appeal against his death penalty today. Think Centre strongly deplores the imminent execution of Kho Jabing today. Although amendments were made to the death penalty regime in 2012, the Government of Singapore continues its defence of the death penalty at both the national and international arena. Singapore's amended death penalty regime is deeply flawed through its failure to apply the minimum threshold required under international law. Many international law experts, academics, and human rights groups have repeatedly expressed concern that Singapore's justification for the deterrent value of the death penalty is without substance. The Government has consistently failed to produce any verifiable or credible empirical evidence in support of its position. Stripped bare of all cleverly worded language, what is left exposed, is a simple emotional appeal for retribution that serves no one's benefit except to demonstrate the overwhelming and unbearable power of the State to determine one's life and death. What is ironic is that the implementation of capital punishment is in itself, through the extensive involvement of august institutions of the Executive, Legislative and the Judiciary, a methodical and calculated act of blatant disregard for human life, par excellence.

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Think Centre's 2016 Labour Day Message

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Posted by TC under Labour Watch, Statement on 1 May 2016

Ever wondered how much the uncles and aunties who clean after we eat at food courts and hawker centres earn? The construction workers who build our homes, bridges and roads? Do we think that amount they get accurately reflects the true value of their contribution to our society and economy? 50 years of single-minded focus on economic development has made it almost impossible for a large segment of workers to find decent work and provide for their families. Most Singaporeans work amongst the longest hours in the world. Wages remain depressed and stagnant for many while companies continue to increase their profits. The only way for real productivity to increase is to strengthen and build the resilience of workers through real strategic investments in their skills and capability and not just as an afterthought. For the longest time, the benefit of a company’s increased profits has gone to shareholders and directors, who even with rising operational cost would rather pass the burden to the consumers and workers than deduct their own salaries, bonuses of directors and top management. We have enabled firms to make careless use of this cheap labour. To protect the workers adequately, we urge the government to harmonise the Labour Laws with International Labour Standards as reflected in the 1998 ILO Declaration which spells out the fundamental principles and rights at work. This is a similar call to many of the countries that made recommendations to our government at the recent Universal Periodic Review conducted by the United Nations in Geneva. Think Centre urges the Government to amend or remove outdated policies to protect the rights of all workers and their families.

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MEDIA STATEMENT BY ALMOS ON THE UNIVERSAL PERIODIC REVIEW

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Posted by Think Centre under Human Rights Watch, Policy Watch, Human Rights Education, Statement on 11 December 2015

As Singapore prepares to engage other United Nations member states on its human rights record at the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) in January 2016, it is clear that much more needs to be done by the government to properly address human rights issues, including to engage Singaporeans on the meaning of human rights in an inclusive society. The Alliance of Like-Minded CSOs in Singapore (ALMOS) is particularly concerned by the government�s overly-broad citation of �national security� in response to questions on the human rights impact of its practices. Citizens are not given a clear indication of the parameters of these security concerns; nor are they provided with convincing evidence that what the state practices is in proportion to the supposed security risks. It has also failed to explain how national security necessitates the turning away of refugees who have been persecuted in their home countries.

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Public Consulted on Library, Chinatown

Posted by Lim Huay Chih, PS 21 Office, Public Service Division, Prime Minister's Office under Features on 25 February 2000

MESSRS Simon Tay, Zulkifli Baharudin and Cherian George in their commentary, " Role of Civil Service in Civil Society " (ST, Feb 17), cited three examples of "civil service intransigence": The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA)'s handling of the National Library issue, the Public Utilities Board (PUB)'s development of water-storage tanks in the nature reserves, and the Singapore Tourism Board's plans for Chinatown.

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The Zaobao Forum Editor

Posted by Chia Shi Teck under Breaking News on 20 February 2000

Chia Shi Teck on Picking NMPs as PAP Candidates.

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Singapore Ready for a More Civil Society

Posted by James Gomez under Features on 17 February 2000

IT is no longer a case that Singapore's nascent civil society has to develop by incremental gains, there is now a window of opportunity for a vertical take-off.

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Role of Civil Service in Civil Society

Posted by Simon S.C. Tay, Zulkifli Baharudin and Cherian George under Features on 17 February 2000

THERE has recently been considerable discussion of civil society in Singapore. Younger ministers such as Brigadier-General (NS) George Yeo and Rear-Admiral (NS) Teo Chee Hean have followed up on Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong's call to develop civil society and an active people sector.

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Get Past the Shock!

Posted by Mohamed Abdullah under Breaking News on 4 February 2000

Self-Censorship: Singapore's Shame by James Gomez, Think Centre, 98 pages, S$18.90

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Youths Let Off With "Warning" for Organising Public Forum

Posted by under Breaking News on 2 February 2000

After ninety days into their investigations, the Tanglin Police Station relented and decided to let, four enthusiastic youths trying to bring the Singapore 21 (S21) process forward, off with a warning. The Attorney-General's Chambers decided not to prosecute the case.

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Thoughts on...

Posted by Michael Roston under Opinions on 1 February 2000

An independent opinion paper by Michael Roston.

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NMP Scheme 'is Useful But Should be Transitional'

Posted by Irene Ng under Breaking News on 29 January 2000

This is to enable it to bring about political change so that a strong opposition and a two-party system may emerge, argues two NMPs.

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Show of Good Faith needed for Civil Society

Posted by Kevin Tan, Valentine Winslow and Lam Peng Er under Features on 28 January 2000

DEPUTY Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong's open call to Singaporeans to engage the Government in debate over national issues, and his assurance that the Government, will be more open to public opinion should be commended and embraced by all Singaporeans.

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Non-Partisanship: Politics Without Punishment

Posted by Tan Kong Soon & Karen Yeo under Public Forums on 28 January 2000

Non-partisanship has been a regular feature in the discourse on civil society and politics. As an idea and platform convenient for political mobilisation, non-partisanship has served to create leverage for expression and articulation of alternative views and ideals. By being non-partisan, one can have more room to manoeurve on sensitive yet crucial issues on the basis of independent, autonomous representations without fear of reprisal from the establishment. Thus, it is no wonder that "non-partisanship" has become such a wide-appealing term within academic, socio-cultural and political circles. However, is it really right to say that non-partisanship carries no costs or risks at all? Extrapolated to the political stage, can non-partisanship still claim to be politics without punishment?

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